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U.S. Ethnic/Race Differences in Aptitude by Generation

#11
(2014-Jul-03, 18:34:06)Emil Wrote: [quote="Chuck"]I don't think that it's necessary to cite every last paper referenced somewhere in a paper. Many people don't do this. I could give you examples. What's the exact policy here? Emil?


Sorry but I didn't have time to review this paper. Concerning this question, I agree with you that sometimes it's not necessary to cite classical papers. For example, many journals want you to give full references for Plato or Kant but I think this is just silly. Since Jensen is to psychology as Plato is to philosophy (they're both classics), I would say references for Jensen or other classics are not compulsory.
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#12
(2014-Jul-03, 22:57:08)Duxide Wrote:
(2014-Jul-03, 18:34:06)Emil Wrote: [quote="Chuck"]I don't think that it's necessary to cite every last paper referenced somewhere in a paper. Many people don't do this. I could give you examples. What's the exact policy here? Emil?


Sorry but I didn't have time to review this paper. Concerning this question, I agree with you that sometimes it's not necessary to cite classical papers. For example, many journals want you to give full references for Plato or Kant but I think this is just silly. Since Jensen is to psychology as Plato is to philosophy (they're both classics), I would say references for Jensen or other classics are not compulsory.


I had tables such as shown in the picture attached which listed the reference at the bottom but for which a reference was not placed in the reference section. I have seen this a million times.


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   
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#13
(2014-Jul-03, 23:41:05)Chuck Wrote:
(2014-Jul-03, 22:57:08)Duxide Wrote:
(2014-Jul-03, 18:34:06)Emil Wrote: [quote="Chuck"]I don't think that it's necessary to cite every last paper referenced somewhere in a paper. Many people don't do this. I could give you examples. What's the exact policy here? Emil?


Sorry but I didn't have time to review this paper. Concerning this question, I agree with you that sometimes it's not necessary to cite classical papers. For example, many journals want you to give full references for Plato or Kant but I think this is just silly. Since Jensen is to psychology as Plato is to philosophy (they're both classics), I would say references for Jensen or other classics are not compulsory.


I had tables such as shown in the picture attached which listed the reference at the bottom but for which a reference was not placed in the reference section. I have seen this a million times.


I think that's fine.
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#14
Meng Hu is currently helping me edit this, check the data, and write up the results, so I am adding him as a co-author. As he is doing an extensive amount of work on the project, he constitutes a biased reviewer regardless of whether he is added as a co-author. As such, his review opinion should probably be discounted (in terms of approval).

(a) We updated the data file, making corrections as needed. There were a number of small mistakes -- made during the computation of hundreds upon hundreds of d-values - but they didn't alter the substance of the results. (b) Meng Hu reorganized the data file to enhance comprehensibility. He is currently working on an appendix which explains the method. This will be added to the excel file or attached separately. (c ) I added a more detailed discussion of Asian American scores and presented several new subgroup analyses e.g., for Pacific Island Americans, etc. (d) Some edits were made and per Emil's request tables altered.


Attached Files
. ethnic-race differences in aptitude by generation - an exploratory meta-analysis (john fuerst 2014edit992014) (odp)   U.S. Ethnic-Race Differences in Aptitude by Generation - An Exploratory Meta-analysis (John Fuerst 2014edit992014) (ODP) (Size: 347.33 KB / Downloads: 117)
.docx   RaceGenUSforOpenPsych2.docx (Size: 985.11 KB / Downloads: 467)
.pdf   RaceGenUSforOpenPsych3.pdf (Size: 1.05 MB / Downloads: 585)
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#15
(2014-Jul-09, 13:10:36)Chuck Wrote: Meng Hu is currently helping me edit this, check the data, and write up the results, so I am adding him as a co-author.


I don't think you should. I have tried to make the table more presentable, and see where the problems are (if any). As I said, it's due to the formulas, sometimes (i.e., rarely) using the wrong cell. I have not "contributed" to this paper. My only task was to make clear that the numbers and formulas are correct, and they are. However, I admit I'm doing too much in reviewing every minor, last details, and probably much more than any other will do.

If you think, despite of that, my opinion can be biased due to my too thorough reviews, then, you should, as i suggested, ask the opinion of some others who have done some works on this field (te Nijenhuis, Woodley, Meisenberg, etc.).

(P.S., I have detected something in the last edit in your excel data file; for the NAEP, grade4 2011 and 2013 have been reversed).

P.S., if you want to apply the $ in your formulas, that should be

=(G$917-G922)/(B$932)

but not ...

=($G917-G922)/($B932)
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#16
OK,

I corrected the Excel File.
I corrected the tables.
The latest edition is attached.

(We haven't decided on MH's status; whatever the case, we need additional reviewers anyways.)


Attached Files
.pdf   RaceGenUSforOpenPsych4.pdf (Size: 1.07 MB / Downloads: 524)
.docx   RaceGenUSforOpenPsych3.docx (Size: 788.6 KB / Downloads: 409)
.xlsx   U.S. Ethnic-Race Differences in Aptitude by Generation - An Exploratory Meta-analysis (John Fuerst 07092014) (ODP).xlsx (Size: 347.32 KB / Downloads: 456)
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#17
I made the tables more readable.


Attached Files
.docx   U.S. Ethnic-Race Differences in Aptitude by Generation - An Exploratory Meta-analysis (John Fuerst 2014) (07132014).docx (Size: 217.18 KB / Downloads: 565)
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#18
For tables 2, 4 and 17, 18, I prefer (and highly recommend) not to present the tables that are merely copy pasting from screenshot/excel spreadsheet. And where are tables 3, 11, 15 ? And what about the big space just above table 4 ? The abstract is annoying. You write "NH" without precising what it is (non-hispanic). You also forget an * for SAT/ACT in the row belonging to NLSF in table 1.
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#19
(2014-Jul-14, 20:33:41)menghu1001 Wrote: For tables 2, 4 and 17, 18, I prefer (and highly recommend) not to present the tables that are merely copy pasting from screenshot/excel spreadsheet.


Why? When I do this all of my numbers are aligned; when I use your method they aren't. Most tables in a typical published paper will be some sort of added in table.
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#20
The paper is fine, and I don't really have any comments on the technical details, but there are some mainly semantic, stylistic, or orthographic issues that should be dealt with (the page numbers refer to the latest pdf version):

1) The meaning of the term "exploratory meta-analysis" is a bit obscure. Anello & Fliess (1995) differentiated between analytic and exploratory meta-analysis in medicine in this way:

<i>If randomized clinical trials are limited to improving an estimate of effect or testing a hypothesis in a relatively homogeneous set of effect sizes, the clinical trial will tend to be less prone to bias than a comparable set of epidemiologic studies. In this context, the issue of combinability may dominate the meta-analysis. We refer to this type of meta-analysis as an “analytic” meta-analysis. On the other hand when the goal is to resolve controversy, or pose and answer new questions the main concern of the meta-analysis is to explain the variation in the effect sizes. We refer to this application of a meta-analysis as an “exploratory” meta-analysis. In this second type of meta-analysis the characteristics of the different studies become the focus of the analysis.</i>

So this suggests that exploratory meta-analysis focuses on finding moderator variables. On the other hand, sometimes the meaning of "exploratory meta-analysis" seems to be that the author conducts original analyses of many data sets and combines their results. In any case, I don't think the word 'exploratory' carries the implication that the literature search was non-systematic. I would say that a meta-analysis is systematic when it involves an exhaustive literature review based on predefined criteria, but if the literature review is incomplete, it doesn't mean that the meta-analysis is exploratory.

So, perhaps the paper could be called a non-systematic meta-analysis, or it could be simple called a (n exploratory) meta-analysis, with an explanation in the text that the literature search was non-exhaustive.

2) p. 1: "John Ogbu’s involuntary minority hypothesis attributes low African American performance to opposition differences arising from being an involuntary diasporia"

Should be "oppositionAL differences". Is 'diasporia' a word? Perhaps "members of an involuntary diaspora"?

3) p. 2: The online tools used could be specified. For example, "Analyzed with NAEP Data Explorer". 'Publicly' is preferable to 'publically'.

4) p. 3: "In this instances"

instance

5) p. 3: "we unweight averaged the survey d-values"

Do you mean "we averaged the unweighted survey d-values"? The whole paragraph is unclear.

6) p. 3.: "For simplicity sake"

simplicity's

7) p. 3: "Generally not using pooled standard deviations had little effect as the White 3rd+ generation sample size overwhelmed the comparison group sample sizes."

Not really relevant here, but I think you generally shouldn't use weights when pooling SDs.

8) p. 4: There's no explanation of how you decided whether a test was a good indicator of g.

9) p. 6: In the results section, you should add a clarification of what the signs of the effect sizes mean, that is, that the numbers are obtained by subtracting non-white scores from white scores.

10) p. 9: "In the case of Blacks, Whites, and Asians there was a high degree of cross generational similarity in aptitude."

It would be clearer to say "cross generational stability".

11) p. 10: "Black migrants to the U.S. and to Europe both from Africa and from the West Indies are, however, very selective with respect to human capital"

Individuals aren't selective but selected, so you should write "Black migration ... is ... very selective" or something like that.

12) p. 16: "dyselected"

dysselected, perhaps 'negatively selected' would be better?

13) Vanhanen's name is misspelled Vanhannen throughout.

14) p. 17: "measure invariant"

measureMENT invariant

15) p. 17: "measure invariance (MI) has been found to hold between non-Hispanic Whites and (presumably mostly second+ generation) Hispanics (Dalliard, 2013)"

Again, measureMENT invariance, and instead of my post, you should reference...

Trundt, K. M. (2013). Construct Bias in the Differential Ability Scales, Second Edition (DAS-­II): A comparison among African American, Asian, Hispanic, and White Ethnic Groups. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Texas, Austin, TX.
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