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[OQSPS] Inequality across prefectures in Japan is different

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I am the person who provided the translated dataset available only in Japanese and I would like to endorse this manuscript as very interesting and valuable. There are several points of interest from my point of view.

1. First, the result of the S factor analysis of Japanese data was fairly different from the previous studies of datasets from worldwide (country-level), Norway, Finland, Denmark, U.S., U.K., Brazil, and Mexico, which have been reported by the author of this paper with much consistency. However, there is no rule without exception. This seems to be a curious case study, to which S factor analysis does not apply as we expected. For example, Figure 2 in this manuscript makes a stark contrast to Figure 1 in the author’s analysis of the 32 London boroughs (2015) cited in the reference.


2. Although the result shows that there seems to be no clear S factor extracted from Japanese data, there are some consistency for some important socioeconomic variables. If we look at variables in Table 1, which have correlation coefficient > | 0.5| (which means that they are highly correlated with cognitive ability in the positive or negative directions), they are Gini coefficient in the asset holding, Unemployment rate, dependency on welfare, Height, Divorce rate. Homicide and skin colors are also very close to this threshold. These relations have become very much stylized in this literature.


3. Apparently, one of the most notable observation in Japanese data is the author’s finding that there is no correlation between the infant mortality and cognitive ability. When I reported this unexpected nonexistence of the correlation three years ago, I was not sure if this was due to some detective error from the statistics, or there is indeed no relationship in Japanese regions. The author decisively resolved this question to be late. In other words, the sophisticated consistency analysis of the author proved that even annual infant mortality data from 47 prefectures do not correlate with each other and they show more or less random fluctuation. I should probably add some information after my publication of the Japanese data: many of my personal acquaintances with medical expertise, have already suggested me that infant mortality in Japan largely depends on the hospital system with advanced obstetrical facilities and experienced personnels.


4. In general, S factor is a very useful and also a substantive analytical tool. Most of the psychologists, including myself, routinely reported the inter-correlations among socioeconomic variables to show that they make a positive manifold. But as has been shown the simplest way to show this should be to factor analyze them in order to extract variable (S factor). This meta-variable is supposed to be the indicator for the r-K continuum of human (or primate) behavioral strategy.


To somewhat digress from the description of the manuscript, I have been wondering why there isn’t a clear S factor found in Japan. Surely, I can think of some supposedly sociological reasons, such as, massive migration from rural to urban regions after the war and its resulting differences in the demographic composition, ceiling effects due to the uniform central governmental system, or too small so far and not yet actualized statistical differences of the immigrants to Japan. Also, as ljzigerell and Emil discuss above, there are many factors affecting the sociological phenomena, such as urbanization seems to have made marriage rate decrease by female workforce participation, and the same factor made divorce rate increase with the spread of more liberal psyche among urban dwellers. However, these changes have occurred in different phases in time and space, and I am not very sure if any of them is compelling enough at this moment. I rather want to see how the result may change in twenty or thirty years later, when more immigrants are expected to settle in and mingle with the gentiles.


Anyway, I hope readers of this manuscript enjoy these findings as I did.
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Messages In This Thread
[OQSPS] Inequality across prefectures in Japan is different - by Emil - 2015-Dec-17, 20:39:57
RE: [OQSPS] Inequality across prefectures in Japan is different - by ljzigerell - 2015-Dec-18, 06:40:56
RE: [OQSPS] Inequality across prefectures in Japan is different - by Emil - 2015-Dec-18, 07:43:46
RE: [OQSPS] Inequality across prefectures in Japan is different - by ljzigerell - 2015-Dec-18, 18:38:52
RE: [OQSPS] Inequality across prefectures in Japan is different - by Emil - 2015-Dec-23, 06:06:58
RE: [OQSPS] Inequality across prefectures in Japan is different - by ljzigerell - 2015-Dec-23, 09:31:09
RE: [OQSPS] Inequality across prefectures in Japan is different - by Kenya Kura - 2015-Dec-23, 19:09:56
RE: [OQSPS] Inequality across prefectures in Japan is different - by Kenya Kura - 2015-Dec-21, 17:43:59
RE: [OQSPS] Inequality across prefectures in Japan is different - by Emil - 2015-Dec-23, 11:17:58
RE: [OQSPS] Inequality across prefectures in Japan is different - by Emil - 2015-Dec-23, 15:57:40
RE: [OQSPS] Inequality across prefectures in Japan is different - by Emil - 2015-Dec-23, 23:05:40
Proofreading - by Emil - 2015-Dec-27, 22:08:17
RE: [OQSPS] Inequality across prefectures in Japan is different - by bpesta22 - 2016-Jan-25, 18:27:51
RE: [OQSPS] Inequality across prefectures in Japan is different - by Emil - 2016-Jan-25, 22:23:50
RE: [OQSPS] Inequality across prefectures in Japan is different - by bpesta22 - 2016-Jan-29, 19:56:06
Reply to Pesta - by Emil - 2016-Jan-30, 11:50:54
RE: [OQSPS] Inequality across prefectures in Japan is different - by NoahCarl - 2016-Apr-04, 16:44:02
RE: [OQSPS] Inequality across prefectures in Japan is different - by Emil - 2016-Apr-05, 23:29:41
RE: [OQSPS] Inequality across prefectures in Japan is different - by NoahCarl - 2016-Apr-06, 12:00:22
RE: [OQSPS] Inequality across prefectures in Japan is different - by Emil - 2016-Apr-06, 19:18:35
 
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