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[OBG] White Skin Privilege. Modern Myth, Forgotten Past

#11
Interesting paper. I have some comments:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-DPE...sp=sharing
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#12
Razib,

I am unable to find any comments from you in the file above. I also tried downloading it and looking without luck.
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#13
Razib has provided we with a link that shows his comments:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-DPE...sp=sharing

I will post a new version of the manuscript shortly.
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#14

.doc   White skin privilege - new.doc (Size: 731 KB / Downloads: 467) The revised version of my manuscript is attached.
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#15
Thanks Peter. I'll read it again.
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#16
I'm moving this to the more appropriate behavioral genetics journal.
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#17
(2015-Nov-16, 18:22:10)Peter Frost Wrote: The revised version of my manuscript is attached.


Peter, I read your paper but I think one limitation is obvious: the paper is focused only on the trade of white women. To have a balanced view, you should perhaps include a discussion on the trade of non-White women
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#18
The white slave trade was unique with no real parallel. It was the only slave trade that primarily involved the commodification of women (and also prepubertal boys). If we look at other cases where slaves were traded on a large scale from one continent to another, we find that most of the slaves were men, usually overwhelmingly so:

1. Transatlantic trade (16th to early 19th centuries) - overwhelmingly men from sub-Saharan Africa. This was especially so with respect to the Spanish and Portuguese colonies where there was much less interest in letting the slaves reproduce. The English colonies imported proportionately more African women, although African men still predominated. In those cases where slave women were preferred as concubines, most of them were of mixed origin (quadroons and octoroons) who physically resembled European women.

2. Indian Ocean and Trans-Saharan trade (8th to 19th centuries) - overwhelmingly men from sub-Saharan Africa until the 18th century. Restriction of the white slave trade (by European powers) led to an increase in trade of African women, particularly among slaves from the Horn of Africa (called Abyssinians at the time). Women from that region were preferred because they phenotypically resembled European women, who became harder to obtain from the 18th century onward.

3. Papua-Java trade (18th century) - overwhelmingly men from present-day Papua New Guinea to plantations in Java.

4. "Blackbirding" (19th century) -overwhelmingly men from the South Pacific to plantations in Australia.

I'm not aware of any transcontinental slave trade, at least none on a large scale, that resembled the white slave trade in this respect. The closest might be the trade in Abyssinian women of the 18th and 19th centuries. To a large degree, however, that market was developed as a substitute for the market in European women.
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#19
(2016-Feb-05, 05:50:28)Peter Frost Wrote: The white slave trade was unique with no real parallel. It was the only slave trade that primarily involved the commodification of women (and also prepubertal boys). If we look at other cases where slaves were traded on a large scale from one continent to another, we find that most of the slaves were men, usually overwhelmingly so:

1. Transatlantic trade (16th to early 19th centuries) - overwhelmingly men from sub-Saharan Africa. This was especially so with respect to the Spanish and Portuguese colonies where there was much less interest in letting the slaves reproduce. The English colonies imported proportionately more African women, although African men still predominated. In those cases where slave women were preferred as concubines, most of them were of mixed origin (quadroons and octaroons) who physically resembled European women.

2. Indian Ocean and Trans-Saharan trade (8th to 19th centuries) - overwhelmingly men from sub-Saharan Africa until the 18th century. Restriction of the white slave trade (by European powers) led to an increase in trade of African women. At no time, however, did African women outnumber African men among the slaves being traded. The only possible exception would be the trade in slaves from the Horn of Africa (called Abyssinians at the time). Women from that region were preferred because they phenotypically resembled European women, who became harder to obtain from the 18th century onward.

3. Papua-Java trade (18th century) - overwhelmingly men from present-day Papua New Guinea to plantations in Java.

4. "Blackbirding" (19th century) -overwhelmingly men from the South Pacific to plantations in Australia.

I'm not aware of any transcontinental slave trade, at least none on a large scale, that resembled the white slave trade in this respect. The closest might be the trade in Abyssinian women of the 18th and 19th centuries. To a large degree, however, that market was developed as a substitute for the market in European women.


Then you could add this discussion to the paper.
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#20
Then you could add this discussion to the paper.

Duxide,

Thanks for the suggestion! I've added the discussion to page 21 and rewritten most of page 20.
.docx   White skin privilege - new2.docx (Size: 658.34 KB / Downloads: 726)
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