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Impact factor?

#1
I recently noticed that Emil's page at ResearchGate lists the impact factors of several of the journals where he's published his research, but it doesn't list the impact factor of ODP. Does anyone know whether the impact factor of this journal has ever been calculated?
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#2
It cannot be calculated before the journal has a certain age. This is because authors need time to cite the papers published therein. According to Wikipedia (which you don't like) "In any given year, the impact factor of a journal is the average number of citations received per paper published in that journal during the two preceding years." The source given for this claim doesn't work however. But the idea is there. Some time has to pass beforehand.

As far as I know, no paper outside of this metajournal has cited any papers. In a pessimistic light, this may be because they think the published material is very low quality. But more likely it is because 1) they haven't had enough time yet, 2) they aren't aware of the papers published here.

To improve the impact factor of the metajournal, one will have to do some marketing. One idea is to send an email to all possibly interested colleagues at the publication of one's paper. I have done this once and will continue with the practice. I also tweet every time a paper is published (including others' papers). Additionally, I blog my own papers. All authors should do this.

Further steps that authors can take is to put their papers on all social networking sites for academics. I signed up for most of them: ResearchGate, Google Scholar, ORCID. One can also post one's papers on discussion groups e.g. on Reddit or Facebook/Google+. Finally, always have a personal website with a publication list with free PDFs.
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#3
(2014-Sep-24, 05:36:07)Emil Wrote: As far as I know, no paper outside of this metajournal has cited any papers. In a pessimistic light, this may be because they think the published material is very low quality. But more likely it is because 1) they haven't had enough time yet, 2) they aren't aware of the papers published here.


If the reason is that they aren't aware of it, I think the best way to fix that is by citing some of your ODP papers when you publish papers in journals like Intelligence and PAID. That's how I first learned about the Human Varieties blog, when Gregory Christainsen mentioned it in this paper.
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#4
I don't intend to publish any more papers in Intelligence unless I absolutely have to. Elsevier is evil.
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#5
I think you should be careful that ODP doesn't follow the same route as The Mankind Quarterly. When that journal first became well-known, the main thing it became known as was a journal where controversial ideas are published, and as a result it's never been well-known as anything else. Three summaries about it from randomly chosen books on Google are here, here, and here. It's very difficult to find books discussing it that don't express this sort of attitude, even if you're specifically looking for them.
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#6
Yes. There are things that set them apart IMO:
- OP is clearly part of the on-going open science movement (open access, open data, open review, open code).
- OP is not run or founded by someone who openly and seriously states antisemitic things. I advocate race-blind policies (e.g. immigration based on standardized testing, not racial background).
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