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[ODP] The Scandinavian WAIS IV Matrices as a Test of Dutton, te Nijenhuis and Rovaine

#61
I'm new to this discussion, so I may be asking a stupid question. Is it possible that the difference in performance between Finland and Sweden reflects differences in truancy? Finland seems to have a harsh policy on truant pupils. According to Wikipedia, "In Finland truant pupils usually get detention in comprehensive schools." Since such pupils would be excluded from the study, and since they probably represent a lower IQ sub-population, this factor would raise the mean IQ of those Finnish pupils under study.

It may be that the Swedish minority in Finland follows Sweden's more permissive attitudes toward truancy, and this would result in a study population that has a somewhat lower mean IQ.
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#62
Actually, I may have it backwards. If the Swedish were more permissive toward truancy, it would be easier for truants to remove themselves from the study population and thereby raise the apparent mean IQ. So to make my explanation work, the Finns would have to be more permissive, unless their policy of detention had the same effect of removing lower-IQ individuals from the regular schools.
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#63
But the Scandinavian data is from all three Scandinavian countries, not just Sweden. Their results are comparable too. The Swedish Finns also get lower scores. I don't see how truancy could explain that.
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#64
Yes, but in the course of history Sweden, Norway, and Denmark have inherited similar educational practices. Norway has alternated between being part of Denmark and part of Sweden. I would expect Finland to be more of an outlier. I would also expect that the Swedish-speaking minority in Finland would tend to imitate educational practices in Sweden (because of the common language).

Finland seems to be an outlier with respect to other Nordic countries in the way it punishes truant pupils. In Finland, such pupils are sent to a special school, whereas in the Scandinavian countries they are kept as much as possible in the regular school system. This would have the effect of removing more low-IQ students from regular schools in Finland than from regular schools in other Nordic countries.

I may be making a big deal out of nothing, but has anyone looked into this factor?
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#65
Hi Peter. Thanks for your idea of truancy. I cannot any evidence that this issue has been researched with regard to a possible influence on PISA. Also my understanding is that there is huge variation in how Finnish truants are dealt between schools http://www.helsinkitimes.fi/finland/finl...uancy.html

and I can find no evidence that they are sent to 'special schools.' As much as possible Finland integrates everybody into a comprehensive system. I am absolutely certain, for example, that there is no 'special school' in the large Finnish city that I live in. So, although it's an interesting possibility I don't think it's relevant to the Finnish PISA score and I'm not even sure there is a significant policy difference between Finland and Scandinavia on truancy. They are all quite lax whereas in the UK, for example, truancy can result in expulsion from school, which may be why the rates there are quite low according to the OECD rport, 'Who are the truants?'






(2014-Nov-16, 02:00:59)Peter Frost Wrote: Yes, but in the course of history Sweden, Norway, and Denmark have inherited similar educational practices. Norway has alternated between being part of Denmark and part of Sweden. I would expect Finland to be more of an outlier. I would also expect that the Swedish-speaking minority in Finland would tend to imitate educational practices in Sweden (because of the common language).

Finland seems to be an outlier with respect to other Nordic countries in the way it punishes truant pupils. In Finland, such pupils are sent to a special school, whereas in the Scandinavian countries they are kept as much as possible in the regular school system. This would have the effect of removing more low-IQ students from regular schools in Finland than from regular schools in other Nordic countries.

I may be making a big deal out of nothing, but has anyone looked into this factor?

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#66
Differences in the truancy rate can have an impact. We see this in the apparent difference in mean IQ between the former West and East Germany. Different truancy rates may also make the black/white IQ difference look smaller than it really is. In the case of Finland vs. the other Nordic states, I've been unable to find anything substantial in the literature. As you say, there seem to be similar policies on truancy in all the Nordic states.

So I give my approval for publication of this manuscript. Good luck!
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#67
Ok, thanks for your suggestions.
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#68
That's 4 approvals. Unless there are objections I will move ahead with publication when I get the opportunity.
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#69
Before publishing, should insert notes where readers can find the datasets. They are here:
Meta-analysis calculations
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1...edit#gid=0
WAIS calculations
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1...edit#gid=0
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#70
Ok, done.

(2014-Nov-18, 06:11:10)Emil Wrote: Before publishing, should insert notes where readers can find the datasets. They are here:
Meta-analysis calculations
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1...edit#gid=0
WAIS calculations
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1...edit#gid=0

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