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[ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score

#17
nooffensebut Wrote:Do you have a source for any of this logic, or are you coming up with it, yourself? When you say total effect, you mean the true total effect that accounts for longitudinal SEM variable effects??? No, the coefficient of determination is specific to the model under consideration.


I have, if I remember, already given one proof of it, in the 2nd paragraph in my comment. Also, I thought everyone who is doing MR should know that r² measures the predictive power of a regression model. And by your comment, you show you already know that. The only instance where r² is equal to the regress coeff is when you have only 1 indep var., and in this case your MR is nothing more than a bivariate correlation.

In any case, if my entire point on MR is wrong. That necessarily means the SEM stuff makes no sense at all. That is, there is no such thing as indirect effect or total effect. Before going this far, you must remember that SEM is nothing more than a MR which, however, has more possibilities, e.g., multiple dependent var., longitudinal and repeated measures, model fit, etc. Given that my blog post showed that the direct path in SEM was indeed the regress coeff as shown in MR, I don't have any doubt about my main point. If you disagree again, you have to explain why the direct path in SEM is the exact equivalent of regress coeff in MR.

Quote:The whole point of standardized regression coefficients is to be able to compare them. Otherwise, why standardize?

I don't understand. I have already explained this point in my post. It does not matter, B or Beta. You must know the total effect. Or at least make some assumptions. For instance, if you have an indep. var. that is unlikely to be caused by others. Say, if you include parents income and parents education, I'm sure you can assume and write that parents income will not cause parents education, and if there is a direction, it must be education->income.

And I don't also understand the stuff about CI of the education variable which includes zero in its band. Because we are still dealing with the direct path.

Another thing I don't understand is why you have put in bold the term multicollinearity. If you think you don't have multicollinearity, then, does the absence of multicollinearity proves there is no correlation between the indep var. ? i.e., that there is no indirect effect ?

See here, by the way.

Quote:If there are no associations between independent variables or the model is perfectly specified, no other techniques need to be employed

The MR is not supposed to give you the r's between the indep. var., or perhaps it's possible to request them, but I don't remember seeing them in SPSS or in Stata anyway. Thus I don't understand how it is possible to make such conclusions. SEM instead can give you the r's between the indep var.

.... .... ....

Emil, normally, I give a(n) (dis)approval+comment if I think I know what to say and what it's about. In the present case, if I accept publication, it means I must endorse a use of MR that I believe is just wrong. Of course, my opinion on that is unlikely to be accepted by others, unless a superman of statistics endorse this view that this is followed by many others. Thus, I don't know what to do. Actually, my feeling is more "no" than "yes" because I don't accept argument from authority, that is, just because most people disagree with me does not mean i'm wrong. This issue must be discussed and we must arrive at an agreement (if we can). So, I'm still continuing the conversation. i want to reach an agreement.

By the way, I don't think it's a problem if I had to refuse to approve. If someone else decides it must be published, I will not say anything more. 3 agreement=publication, it's simple as that. Like I said before, the best strategy is always to side with the majority, even if you're wrong. In other journals, it's clear no one else will take my comments on MR seriously, and everyone will ignore me. Then if you do the same, i will not object.
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Messages In This Thread
[ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by nooffensebut - 2014-Jun-04, 00:49:06
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Duxide - 2014-Jun-04, 10:05:19
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Meng Hu - 2014-Jun-08, 01:56:17
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Philbrick Bastinado - 2014-Jun-08, 01:59:35
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Meng Hu - 2014-Jun-08, 02:40:46
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Emil - 2014-Jun-08, 15:27:37
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by nooffensebut - 2014-Jun-11, 07:01:57
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Meng Hu - 2014-Jun-11, 21:17:30
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by csdunkel - 2014-Jun-11, 22:42:00
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by nooffensebut - 2014-Jun-11, 23:33:21
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Meng Hu - 2014-Jun-14, 23:04:00
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Emil - 2014-Jun-12, 00:22:29
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by nooffensebut - 2014-Jun-15, 03:03:29
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Emil - 2014-Jun-15, 14:57:16
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by nooffensebut - 2014-Jun-15, 15:49:58
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Meng Hu - 2014-Jun-16, 00:34:23
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Emil - 2014-Jun-15, 17:12:11
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by nooffensebut - 2014-Jun-16, 01:51:23
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Meng Hu - 2014-Jun-17, 04:11:11
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Emil - 2014-Jun-16, 03:53:08
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Emil - 2014-Jun-18, 07:03:21
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Meng Hu - 2014-Jun-18, 18:06:28
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Emil - 2014-Jun-19, 05:38:32
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by nooffensebut - 2014-Jun-21, 08:49:53
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Emil - 2014-Jun-24, 16:14:23
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Meng Hu - 2014-Jun-30, 18:18:16
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by nooffensebut - 2014-Jul-01, 03:47:55
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Duxide - 2014-Jul-01, 14:08:44
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Meng Hu - 2014-Jul-02, 12:45:15
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by nooffensebut - 2014-Jul-02, 17:51:06
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Duxide - 2014-Jul-02, 18:15:28
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Meng Hu - 2014-Jul-03, 01:29:16
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by nooffensebut - 2014-Jul-03, 02:52:39
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Meng Hu - 2014-Jul-03, 03:25:11
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Emil - 2014-Jul-03, 16:05:01
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by nooffensebut - 2014-Jul-03, 22:09:13
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Emil - 2014-Jul-03, 23:13:46
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by nooffensebut - 2014-Jul-04, 01:24:51
RE: [ODP] - Parents’ Income is a Poor Predictor of SAT Score - by Emil - 2014-Nov-06, 02:52:41
 
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