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Submitted on behalf of the authors.

Title: A Standardization of the Standard Progressive Matrices in Egypt

Authors:
Salaheldin Farah Attallah Bakhiet
Richard Lynn

Abstract
Results are reported for intelligence in Egypt assessed with the Standard Progressive Matrices on a sample of 7,600 aged 6.0 to 20 plus years. The sample obtained a British IQ of 89.25.

Key words: intelligence; Standard Progressive Matrices; Egypt

The submission text has been moved to Google Drive. -Emil
- The authors should provide more information about the participants. Since the age range extends to 20, I assume they were not all schoolchildren. If so, how were the adults recruited? Were they paid for participation?

- Were the tests administered in Classical Arabic?

- Did any of the participants learn Arabic as a second language? Given the location, I suspect some of them were Nubian-speakers.

- Did the results differ between Muslims and Coptic Christians?
(2014-Sep-02, 21:28:42)Peter Frost Wrote: [ -> ]- Were the tests administered in Classical Arabic?

Is it really an issue, here ? We are talking about the Raven, after all. If they understand what they have to do, I don't see the problem. However, I agree that a little more information on the participants will be welcomed, if possible.
It is an issue because many if not most Egyptians have trouble reading Classical Arabic. This is particularly so for Coptic Christians, who make up a large proportion of the population in Upper Egypt.
(2014-Sep-03, 18:35:14)Peter Frost Wrote: [ -> ]It is an issue because many if not most Egyptians have trouble reading Classical Arabic. This is particularly so for Coptic Christians, who make up a large proportion of the population in Upper Egypt.

The SPM are a visual test so they do not require language comprehension.
The test is visual but it's preceded by instructions that may be given orally or in writing. I realize that the nature of the test seems self-evident to the two of us, but that may not be so for a naïve test-taker. In particular, the test-taker should be told how much time he/she should allow for each question. Otherwise, the test-taker may waste time making sure that each answer is right and not finish the test in time.

This is a problem even if the test-taker is told that time has to be budgetted. Some people have no sense of time. The test thus becomes a measure of time preference and not cognitive skills.
I more or less agree with you, Peter. But in reading "administered" I was thinking about the language of the test, not especially the instructions, even though I know it's important too. In Bias in Mental Testing (chapter 15) Jensen said that he had been shocked (sometimes) to see how the test-takers (schoolchildren, if my memory is correct) did not understood some very simple instructions.

Concerning timing, I read from a certain paper (I forgot the title) that the manual from the Raven stated explicitly that the test should be administered without time limits, because if not, then it does not really measure g, but also a speed component (or something related) that wasn't purported to be measured. For what I have seen, in general, it seems that most studies use Raven with time limits, and the test was not 60-items, but 36 items or so. But these studies were merely using the Raven for correlating it with other psychological measures; sometimes the Raven was also administered with some other cognitive or achievement tests (which may explain why the test of Raven has been shortened, in order to avoid too much energy and burden for taking the tests). Maybe this does not apply here.
Speed Raven vs. Raven makes little difference. No big influence of any speed factor as long as 'enough' time is allowed. Discussed multiple times by Jensen, I think in both of the last two books.

In a Danish study of teachers, they used a 10 item Raven's. I asked the researchers why they used such a short version, but they apparently didn't understand the problem because they just answered me that "because they didn't use all the items". Wat.
Quote:We e now have five studies of the Egyptian IQ of which the median is 83.

Missing word or something.

-

The table has an extra column at the end.

-

I have put the data here.

The mean given for ages 6-15 has a rounding error. It is 89.6, not 89.5. These are unweighted means. The weighted means are a bit higher: 89.7 and 89.6. These are preferable.

British centile and IQ is missing from the age 6 group.

Why did the authors not use the American centiles for 16-17 year olds as they do in the other studies?

There is a moderate positive correlation, .43, between age group and IQ. Could be sign of many things. It is not significant with only N=12 though.
A reply from Richard.

Quote:Dear Emil

We have revised this paper to meet the comments of your reviewer and attach the revision

A Standardization of the Standard Progressive Matrices in Egypt

In the revision we have added "The test was administered in Arabic, the first language of the participants,"

We are not able to answer the reviewer's other points because the information is not given in the report.

Best regards

Richard
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